Production Machining

DEC 2014

Production Machining - Your access to the precision machining industrial buyer.

Issue link: https://pm.epubxp.com/i/418671

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 67 of 75

Walter Indexable Inserts with Positive Geometry Walter has expanded its Tiger·tec Silver range of indexable inserts with three new ISO P geometries, all possessing a positive cutting- edge design. These three new products, the FP4, MP4 and RP4, are available with WPP10S, WPP20S and WPP30S Tiger·tec Silver cutting grades. The combination of Tiger·tec Silver and these geometries can result in signifcant increases in performance. During a recent auto industry feld test, an MP4 insert made from WPP10S Tiger·tec Silver produced 60 components compared with 35 produced with a competing product. The inserts are aimed at specifc ap- plications ranges. The FP4 (F = fnishing) is optimized for fnishing and achieves the best surface fnish quality and chip control for pre- cision machining, the company says. The MP4 (M = medium) is for mid-range machining with a feed rate range with good chip control. It is the most universal design of the three new inserts and is particularly well suited for machining materials such as structural steel or other low carbon steels. Both the MP4 and FP4 geometries have been optimized for short chipbreaking, which is efective on long chipping materi- als, such as structural steels. The MP4 geometry is available with two clearance angles—7 degrees and 11 degrees. The clearance angle of 11 degrees enables machining of small diameters with low tool pressure, especially for thin wall or delicate components. Finally, the RP4 (R = roughing) ofers a highly stable cut- ting edge for roughing forged steel parts or cast iron. This insert is an ideal choice for high volume machining. The positive cutting edge design can ofer numerous benefts, such as lower cutting pressures and a lower force cutting action for machining small diameters or long, unstable components. :: Walter USA, LLC 800-945-5554 walter-tools.com/us Mazak's Hybrid Multitasking Technology Mazak Corporation's Integrex i-400AM (additive manufacturing) hybrid multitasking machine reduces part cycle times while provid- ing high efciency done-in-one processing. As a turnkey system, the machine ofers manufacturers an alternative to conventional processing in terms of part design and machining. The technology is especially well suited for small lot production of difcult-to-cut materials such as those used in the aerospace, energy and medical industries. With the additive capa- bility, manufacturers can easily generate/clad near-net-shape com- ponent features, then quickly complete them with high-precision fnish machining operations, as well as laser mark parts, if needed. In operation, the i-400AM melts metal powder using fber laser heat. Cladding heads (additive manufacturing nozzles) apply the molten material layer by layer, each of which solidifes as the desired shape grows. Plus, the system can join diferent types of metals to one another, a capability benefcial in the efcient repair of existing worn or damaged components, such as aerospace turbine blades. Cladding heads store in the multitasking machine's tool maga- zine, and the standard automatic tool changer loads them into the ma- chine's milling turret. Mazak ofers two types of cladding heads: high speed or high accuracy. Users select the appropriate head based on the intended process and the particular metal powder to be used. On the multitasking machine side, the Integrex i-400AM pro- vides full fve-axis capability to easily process prismatic parts from solid billets or castings (chucked or bar fed), round parts, highly contoured parts and now those with features built using addi- tive technology. The machine provides -30/+210 degree B-axis movement in its milling spindle, full C-axis contouring with its turning spindle and an NC tailstock that is fully programmable. :: Mazak Corp. 859-342-1700 mazakusa.com PRODUCTS 66 PRODUCTION MACHINING :: DECEMBER 2014

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Production Machining - DEC 2014